Clearing Your Cache

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I was going through the morning mail when I chanced upon a great article from PC magazine about clearing the cache on any browser. That begs the question…”Why do we care about the cache?’.

Our computers, just like squirrels hoard bits of information from every web page they visit. The reason behind this is that all web pages are comprised of hundreds or thousands of files. Browsers, as a measure of efficiency try to minimize network bandwidth usage and make the loading of these pages faster by storing those bits of information. The fact is, that browsers can pull information from the cache, which is stored locally on your computer more quickly than they can pull fresh files from a server.

The problem arises when changes or updates are made to the files. When this happens, you might encounter run-time errors, or things missing from the web-page that are necessary for functionality, or sometimes the cache becomes confused or corrupted. Often, these problems are solved by clearing the cache and cookies. If the cache is empty there is no corruption or confusion. When you visit web pages fresh files will be downloaded because there is nothing stored in the empty cache. The tricky bit is that each browser has its own technique to clearing the cache. Check out the article “How to Clear Your Cache on Any Browser” at http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2480401,00.asp for details on clearing your cache.

 

Connie Pilato

Connie Pilato

Connie Pilato is the Academic Technology Support Specialist for Jamestown Community College, and has more than 20 years providing technology support in various roles at the college. While her primary assignment is to support the faculty of the Cattaraugus County Campus, she is available to assist both full-time and adjunct faculty regardless of their campus location.

Among her significant previous positions, Connie served as Network Design Engineer/Central Office Equipment, and Network Design Engineer/Special Circuits at ALLTEL, a telecommunications company.

Connie holds a M.S. in Curriculum Design and Instructional Technology from University of Albany – SUNY, and a B.S. in Business (Magna Cum Laude) from SUNY Fredonia.

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